Wolf, © Michael S. Quinton, National Geographic Stock

Wolf Weekly Wrap-up

Defenders has submitted comments on the Mexican gray wolf proposal, have you? — Last week, Defenders formally submitted comments to the Fish and Wildlife Service regarding the Service’s proposal for future management of Mexican gray wolves in the southwest. While we support some of the changes, including, of course, re-listing the lobo as protected under the Endangered Species Act, the proposal has some serious other flaws that will undermine recovery efforts. More astonishing is the fact that the Service itself admits some of these flaws, but doesn’t take steps to fix them in its proposal:

  • The Service acknowledges that it lacks a legally valid recovery plan for the Mexican gray wolf. (The Service needs to expedite completion and implementation of a revised and legally sufficient recovery plan. Mexican gray wolves cannot recover without a science-based recovery plan.)
  • The Service acknowledges that the current wild population is neither self-sustaining nor viable. (According to recovery team scientists, at least two additional populations need to be established, with dispersal allowed among them, yet no such proposal is included in the plan.)

Have you submitted your comments yet? If not, feel free to take a look at ours for examples of what you might include. You have until December 17th to comment, but don’t delay… the lobos are already running out of time for a chance at real recovery.

Final federal wolf hearings loom — The sad march toward federal delisting of wolves continues later in November when the federal government holds a series of public hearings on their proposal to strip federal protections from most gray wolves in the lower 48 states. This could be our last chance to let the Fish and Wildlife Service know what we think of their delisting push so we’re counting on wolf supporters across the west to make their voices heard at these meetings. The hearings will take place as listed below:

  •  November 19 in Denver, Colorado
  •  November 20 in Albuquerque, New Mexico
  •  November 22 in Sacramento, California
  •  December 3 in Pinetop, Arizona

For more information on these hearings and how you can help, please visit www.savewolves.org.

Bon Voyage!  – Tomorrow, our western gray wolf expert Suzanne Stone is traveling to Australia to help dingo researchers evaluate nonlethal methods used to minimize livestock losses to wolves in hopes that some of these techniques can reduce the killing of dingo as a main strategy for protecting domestic sheep and learn any new methods applicable to our work in the states.  The dingo is a wild dog, present in Australia for several thousand years according to the current research, but a descendant, like all dogs, of wolves. Dingoes are the only remaining apex predator in the country and extremely important to helping preserve biodiversity by keeping prey species in balance and healthy.  We’ll be receiving news from Suzanne in the field and a blog on her efforts there in the coming weeks. 

Asking for balance in Wisconsin – Last week Defenders (and so far 68,907 of you) sent a letter to Wisconsin’s Secretary of Natural Resources asking that she restore balance to the state’s Wolf Advisory Committee. After the committee was restructured in March of this year several hunting, trapping, and livestock interests made it on the newly-formed committee, while only one wolf conservation group was invited. If you haven’t already, click here to ask that more stakeholders and independent scientists get a voice in wolf management decisions.

 

John Yeingst is Defenders’ Communications Coordinator

 

11 Responses to “Wolf Weekly Wrap-up”

  1. Richard Reesh

    The wolf is necessary to provide balance and a healthy environment. Humanity can’t be so greedy as to be unable to share the the wonders of nature and allow them to co-exist with us. We must find a way to protect all living things. They have a purpose and they need to be allowed to do their job. Remove one link and everything goes out of control. Look at how Yellowstone has benefited since wolves were reintroduced there. This can happen everyone. Let nature take its course.

    Reply
  2. Sussi S

    Wolves needs to be protected!! They’re important animals & they deserve to live & run free!!!

    Reply
  3. debra taylor

    Why can I travel to Africa and see hyenas and african wild dogs and elephants and so many animals in there natural environment.. yes in large national parks.. some not in parks.. But in the US, I go to our national parks and I see birds! NO preditors ever!

    Reply
  4. Georgina Burns

    Please let people who really know what they are talking about and care about the beautiful wolves, always be a part of any decisions made regarding them.

    Reply
  5. CANDACE E.LUFFMAN

    I HAVE BEEN A WOLF FAN FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS.
    AND I AM SO SICK & TIRED OF THESE STUPID HATEFUL HUNTERS THAT GO
    AROUND KILLING ALL THESE BEAUTIFUL WOLVES.. WHY NOT KILL SHARKS & ALL THESE OTHER BAD FISH BUT LEAVE THE WOLVES & DOLPHINS ALONE. GOD PUT ALL HIS BEAUTIFUL ANINMALS ON THIS WORLD. ALL HUNTERS SHOULD HUNT SOMETHING ELSE. LEAVE ALL WOLVES AND
    OTHER ANIMALS ALONE OK?

    Reply
  6. geri perry

    Please protect our wolves from extinction. The wolves are part of nature’s eco system and it is our pleasure to protect them. They are sooooo beautiful. geri

    Reply
  7. Cmdr. Humphrey M. Dimitrov

    I believe wolves are to be protected.
    They have given us so much. Wolves gave us dogs and we need to respect that. They gave us thousands of years of happiness with our dogs. Dogs are descendants of the wolf and are loving, kind, and friendly. We owe them so much and I believe that they should be granted immense respect.
    They can offer you a family and love if you just gave them the chance and take the proper steps. They have so much more to give us. Save our wolves.
    Screw elk and deer. What do they offer?
    Wolves at least offer you something and some interest. They are beautiful creatures just as important as any other.
    They keep our forests from being eaten up. Deer, Elk, and Moose all eat up that beauty. Wolves keep the perfect balance in the animal kingdom.
    Wolves are one of the most beautiful creatures out there.
    They can be friendly. There has been incidences where people have run into a wolf pack and instead of being attacked, they were greeted with nuzzling, licking and playfulness. :)

    Reply
  8. Rebecca Woodruff

    It is a sad day that the supreme arrogance of the human race places us in hearings about whether or not an entire species is “Essential” to US. Like we were GOD. And what will we do with the absence of these apex predators? We will need to manage all of the animal kingdom. And Of course we can do that because we are arrogant humans.

    Reply

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