Wolf, © Michael S. Quinton, National Geographic Stock

Wolf Weekly Wrap-Up

Independent Peer Scientists Say The Service’s Gray Wolf Delisting Proposal is Not Based on Good Science: Wolf advocates’ concerns were validated last week when five independent peer review scientists unanimously concluded that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s proposal to delist wolves across much of the lower 48 was not based on the best available science. It’s something we’ve been telling the Service ever since their proposal came out last year and now independent expert scientists have said the same thing!  The wolf peer review scientists agreed unanimously that the information used by Service in their delisting proposal, which relied heavily on one report, prepared by Service biologists and published in an obscure journal, contained significant interpretation errors, key omissions, and a selective use of evidence. Moreover, the peer reviewers felt that conclusions from this report were shaky—“not universally accepted” in their words—and that the Service’s decisions on species classification and the historic range of wolves were simply wrong.

Wolf, © Michael S. Quinton/National Geographic Stock

If this peer review process tells us anything, it tells us – yet again – that the Service is not treating wolves in the same way it treated the recovery of the bald eagle, peregrine falcon or the American alligator. Each of these species reached recovery throughout their range before being taken off the endangered species list.  We’d all love to see wolves eventually come off of the endangered species list, but not until they are recovered. It should now be clear to all that the Service’s current proposal is not supported by the best available science and would jeopardize gray wolf recovery in the U.S. We are asking the Service to withdraw their delisting proposal and you can help us by sending your comments to Secretary Jewell.

More Bad News from Idaho.  Just when you thought it was safe for wolves in Idaho’s Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, Idaho announces a new plan to kill up to 60 percent of wolves in this Wilderness. It was just a few weeks ago that a hunter-trapper hired by the state in an effort to exterminate two wolf packs in the Middle Fork area was forced to pack out, the result of legal pressure from Defenders and our conservation partners. This week, Idaho Department of Fish and Game released a new wolf control plan for the area designed to boost elk populations for commercial outfitters and hunters, and authorizing the killing of up to 60 percent of the wolves in the area. In response to the proposal, Idaho resident and Defenders of Wildlife representative Suzanne Stone said:

Gray Wolf, © Joan Poor“It’s clear that Idaho Department of Fish and Game isn’t interested in sustainable wolf recovery. Instead, they’re focused on doing anything they can to kill as many wolves as possible in the state. That’s not responsible state wildlife management any way you look at it. Idaho committed to responsibly managing wolves when federal protections were removed just a few short years ago. Actions like this just further demonstrate that they’re failing to uphold their end of the agreement.”

We’ll be working to block this harmful policy. Please stay tuned for more information and actions you can take to help us end this senseless killing of wolves.

Calling on Idaho Residents: Your Chance To Testify Against Governor Otter’s Proposed $2 Million Wolf Killing Fund Has Come! You’ve likely heard of Gov. Butch Otter’s egregious state Wolf Control Board proposal, to be funded by $2 million in taxpayer dollars to implement lethal wolf control programs throughout Idaho. This proposal is dangerously close to becoming law in Idaho. Last week, a bill to authorize this board gained traction in Idaho’s state legislature, and on Monday, February 17, 2014 the Idaho House Resources and Conservation Committee is taking public comments on the proposed legislation. If it passes through Committee, it will move for a vote on the House floor, and then it will be voted on in the Senate. Wolf, © Richard Seeley / National Geographic StockWolves need as many voices as possible to speak out against this proposal now before this bill moves closer to becoming law.You can participate in a hearing on Monday and give your testimony to the Committee voting on the legislation. This bill’s sponsors intend to drive Idaho’s wolf population down as low as 150 out of an estimated population of between 500 – 600 wolves. We cannot let this happen. Please attend this important hearing with us and speak out against the growing anti-wolf sentiment polluting Idaho’s politics and wildlife management – details below. Not an Idaho resident?Click here to support our work.

When: Monday February 17th at 1:30pm

What:  Resource and Conservation Committee Public Hearing for HB 470

Where: Idaho State Capitol, Room EW40

 

 

 

 

 

25 Responses to “Wolf Weekly Wrap-Up”

  1. Kristina Thorpe

    I ask all my friends to spend their tourist dollars in Aspen until this stupid, illogical (on many levels) practice is reversed. No Sun Valley, no river trips. I hope it’s
    reversed soon.

  2. Rochelle Willis

    Its almost like they’re killing these poor animals to spite people who don’t want them to. The more people are outraged and voice their disgust, the more these morons want to kill.

  3. Lisa Schurz

    Please! Wolves are a vital part in maintaining the eco system. Protect & save our wolves!

  4. Lauren Starr

    This is horrible, catering to hunters to shoot elk and deer just so that the state can profit off the killing. Putting their profits ahead of the environment and proper ecological balance. The wolves improve the herds by weeding out the lame, sick and weak. This allows the herds to become stronger, as well as protects the trees and vegetation from being over foraged by larger herds. There is no reason that these wolves need to be killed. If you want them moved, relocate them. But stop killing animals just cause they are in the way of your profits.
    It’s selfish and unbalances the environment – learn to live with nature. Stop trying to force control over it. It won’t turn out well in the end.

  5. P. Dyer

    Those wolf-killers in Idaho and thereabouts seem to have some strange obsession with killing them. Obviously they are unable to take any joy in the sound of a howling wolf at night or anything else about the animals-it’s just “KILL IT!” with those folks. Why don’t they just pave over the entire state, thus ensuring NO animals at all will be able to live there? Would that make them feel better?

  6. Bonnie Welch

    Ok, trying to keep my temper out of this….
    1). Regardless of the [ few ] numbers of the wolves that have made their way back from near extinction, do these “scientist it’s” not appreciate the need and urgency of keeping all animals for the welfare of the natural and environmental order. Do they not understand the havoc already unleashed on the planet by the complete disregard of species resulting in the extinction of thousands of species.
    2). Are the ranchers so greedy that they won’t put up electric fences. We

  7. Rebecca Keaton

    Ranchers just grouped together complaining about what the elk were doing to their herds. Can no one put simple numbers together and figure out that leaving the wolves alone would cause elk numbers to be healthier and in more realistic numbers. I don’t get it.

  8. Antonia

    I will never understand how some people in a nation that loves dogs so much can harbor such hatred and ill will toward their forebears. Will these people not be satisfied until wolves are extinct? Elk, buffalo and other animals are preyed on by wolves, true, but this is a natural occurrence and how wolves survive. Killing any form of wildlife in great numbers upsets the balance of nature that the Creator intended.

  9. Greg Barton

    When people in Idaho get attacked by wolves, it’s not because they’re super vicious. It’s because of decisions like this. When a wolf sees a person, they automatically assume that they’re going to try and kill them. Yes, as you all know, wolves DO think. Maybe not like a human but they have survival thinking. I have been an animal lover all my life and I’m 49. These ” people ” who make these decisions forget who they work for. You. I live in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Wolves are Beautiful Animals. Every animal was here before us. In different forms though. There was the Sabre Tooth Tiger now they’re are many versions of wild cats. The same with wolves but I can’t think of their prehistoric cousin. Of course we have Alligaters, Crocodiles, Gila Monsters,etc…………..that still somewhat remain unchanged from the their prehistoric day. Anyway, I’m sorry to take up your time. I love Wolves and don’t want them, like you do, on the extinct side. Take Care, Greg( Real Name.)

  10. Kara

    I believe that targeting wolves like this is completely irrational. What has become of us as human beings. The animals that inhabit this world have just as much right to be hear as us humans and I feel like wolves are being singled out unnecessarily. I expect Governor Otter to do the right thing and not allow the wolves to be killed any more. They along with other animals need to be managed properly, not eliminated to the extreme.

  11. Kathy palmer

    Stop this totally barbaric slaughter there is no need whatsoever! You people who make these destructive decisions are a disgrace to humankind shame on you! Wolves are gods creatures and should have respect you decision makers show no mercy shame on you!!

  12. Kathy palmer

    Why do you decision makers want to kill gods creatures it’s totally unnecessary cruel you show no compassion please stop the relentless killing PLEASE!

  13. Greta Bro

    I am very distressed to learn that the US Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to de-list wolves as endangered across most of the lower 48 states. Wolves are clearly not getting the same protection as other endangered species. Americans have a brutal history with wolves. We have already bough them to the edge of extermination in the US once. I urge the Fish and Wildlife Service to rethink the wolf agenda now. Big predators play an important role in the balance of life. It is we humans who are disconnected and out of balance with the natural world. We have blindly polluted water supplies, carelessly destroyed ancient habitats and eco-systems and now humanity and all other species sit on the brink of disaster. Please, show wisdom and courage and continue to defend the right of wolves to be protected so that they may again thrive in the wild places of America. I live in an area that is heavily populated by coy wolves. They do not interfere with my life and help to keep the local rodent population in check. Thank you for seriously considering my comment! Greta Bro

  14. Greta Bro

    I am very distressed to learn that the US Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to de-list wolves as endangered across most of the lower 48 states. Wolves are clearly not getting the same protection as other endangered species. Americans have a brutal history with wolves. We have already bough them to the edge of extermination in the US once. I urge the Fish and Wildlife Service to rethink the wolf agenda now. Big predators play an important role in the balance of life. It is we humans who are disconnected and out of balance with the natural world. We have blindly polluted water supplies, carelessly destroyed ancient habitats and eco-systems and now humanity and all other species sit on the brink of disaster. Please, show wisdom and courage and continue to defend the right of wolves to be protected so that they may again thrive in the wild places of America. I live in an area that is heavily populated by coy wolves. They do not interfere with my life and help to keep the local rodent population in check. Thank you for seriously considering my comment! Greta Bro

  15. helen erickson

    very sad when government only takes care of wealthy ranchers and cares nothing about the animals that can not speak for themselves. how will you look your grandchildren in the eye and say there is no more because i allowed them to be wiped out, so i could get paid by the ranchers.

  16. KAREN SAVILLE

    HATS OFF TO LAUREN STARR,,,SHE SAID IT ALL,,,THE KILLING OF WOLFS IS NOTHING MORE THAN A MONEY GRAB,,, WHAT THE GOVERNMENT IS SAYING,,,LET US IMPORT SOME RICH TOURIST (HUNTERS) AND THE CAN KILL ALL THE ELK THEY WANT,,,,JUST KEEP FILLING UP THE MONEY BAGS,,,THEY ARE NOTHING MORE THAN THIEVES WITH A LICENCE AND A TITLE,,,WHAT WAS LEFT OF THE GENOCIDE OF NATIVES, THEY PUT ON RESERVES,,,BUFFALO IN ZOOS,,,AND THE LIST GOES ON,,,WHEN THE WOLFS ARE NO LONGER AMONG US,,,,WHAT IS NEXT,,,??? STOP THE SLAUGHTER NOW,,,WE CANNOT AFFORD TO LOSE ONE MORE SPECIES,,, WE ALL HAVE A VOICE,,,IT IS TIME TIME TO START HOWLING LOUD AND HARD,,,KAREN,,,

  17. Lkaloi

    What is the difference to the danger that too many coyotes can cause, aren’t I know they aren’t pack animals but to many single ones cause trouble too. Wouldn’t wolves help balance that out too. I grew up hearing coyotes never Im only 30 but I was never told about wolves except in movies where they were in Northern places. I’m heart broken for these animals. I have my claws on a rescued dog from a shelter she looks a little wolfish but I hope she isn’t. She just wouldn’t belong with me in an apt. She is small so hopefully shes just a ix of husky. She was found wandering around so goodness I hope I can keep track of her.

  18. Josh

    I am not afraid to admit I am a hunter and therefore a wildlife conservationist. I agree many hunters have the ” kill em all” attitude towards wolves but many of the comments here appear to be purley emotional as well. I believe hunters are the greatest conservationists for the work we have accomplished for the greater good of all wildlife not just the hot button species of the day. Do you not understand that by managing the wolves, just like state wildlife agencies manage every other species, the long term wefare of the wolf is better served? Why are your voices not
    heard about the plummeting ungulate herds that the wolves have caused? Please
    continue this debate so we can better understand all views regarding the wolf
    debate.

  19. Nathanael

    I hate those people. The wolf is my favorite animal and if it goes extinct I swear I will make the government pay!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  20. Ben Hallows

    I can’t wait for these sorry excuses for human beings to become hunted in the same way that our wolf companions are,I personally wish for every single one of them starting with otter to get caught in a trap so i can personally strangle every single wolf hunter on the planet,it just sickens me how low some people have gotten,I have a wolf hybrid as a son and I dare any hunter to come close to him….so sick of these sorry ass excuses for human beings

  21. Randy C

    I live in NE Washington State. Wolves are being reintroduced here. The problem is that raising cattle and wolves are not compatible. Our ancestors that settled this area knew that and killed all the wolves to protect their herds from the wolves. A rancher I know who is not rich (just a working guy like the rest of us, has had this experience since the wolves have been introduced.) He has lost two calves (value around $800 ea) he has noticed his cattle are stressed often being chased by wolves, teats torn off chunks of flesh ripped and torn from hind quarters. The constant chasing of his cattle reduce his cattle’s weight gains and again costs him in potential profit. He has not received any compensation for lost cattle and the wolves reintroduction is very negatively affecting his lively hood. My question is how would you feel if we trapped and released wolves in downtown Seattle or Portland or LA or San Francisco? Would you ask why is someone introducing wolves in those areas? This is where we live, you are endangering us our families our dogs,cats pets etc. We are no different here we feel the same way. The areas you are living in were once the wolves domain as well. Somehow with you god given powers (and superior voting power) you have decided we live in the sticks and our homes and lands are wolf habitat, but yet were you live is not. I really feel that the wolf can be a part of our world without taking over the ability of ranchers to do what they have been doing for well over a hundred years. If nothing else they should be paid fair compensation for their losses and not forced to bear the true costs of wolf reintroduction.

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