Photo by Ian M Dutton

Wolf Weekly Wrap Up

Congressman DeFazio Requests Wolf Protection Zone Outside Yellowstone National Park: Longtime wolf advocate, Congressman Peter DeFazio, this week sent a letter toSecretary of the Interior Sally Jewell urging the Department to create a buffer zone outside of Yellowstone National Park to protect wolves that wander outside the park’s boundaries. While wolves are protected within Yellowstone, they are open to being killed when they exit the park because Idaho and Montana were given the control to manage wolves outside the park in 2011. Yellowstone wolves, © NPSAs expected, since 2011, numerous wolves have been killed just outside Yellowstone’s borders. National Park Service reports that as of March 1, 2013, 12 Yellowstone wolves had been legally killed just outside the park’s borders. Defazio’s proposed buffer zone would give this population of wolves the additional protection they need. And, it would seem that such a buffer zone is in the best interest of the states’ economies since so many tourists travel far and wide to see wolves in national parks. For example, a 2006 study by University of Montana researchers found that the return of wolves to Yellowstone National Park brings an estimated $35 million in annual tourist revenue to the region.

Wolf, © David BolinGreat News for Wolves in Washington! Last week we told you that Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is soliciting proposals for hunting-related regulations for the 2015-2017 seasons. One of the categories that were seeking proposals on was wolves. But, this week WDFW took wolves off their list of species to be considered for the 2015-2017 hunting season! Wolves are still recovering and protected in the state and should not be hunted. A big thank you to all who submitted comments to WDFW!

Wolf, © Mike Wheeler

A gray wolf in Yellowstone National Park

Update On Idaho’s Wolf Control Board: You may have heard that earlier this month Gov. Otter’s wolf control board was established. The wolf control board will rely exclusively on lethal control, with the stated intention of driving Idaho’s current population of 659 wolves down as low as 150 wolves statewide. The board is expected to receive $400,000 from taxpayers annually for up to five years for a total of $2 million dollars. As of right now, non-lethal methods of preventing livestock losses to wolves like fencing and range riders will not be considered by the board. Defenders will continue to work with elected officials and those involved with the wolf control board to recommend that they use non-lethal controls to prevent livestock losses to wolves. In many cases, non-lethal tools are more cost effective and sustainable in the long term. For example, for $400,000 Idaho could purchase more than 117 miles of turbofladry — a barrier that scares wolves away from livestock pastures. That much turbofladry would help protect about 117 different calving grounds or sheep night corrals per year.

Mexican gray wolf pup, © USFWS

Washington’s Residents Want Wolves Protected: Today, the return of wolves to Washington is one of the most powerful success stories of endangered species’ recovery under the Endangered Species Act. And, according to a new survey released at the end of May by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), the wolves’ return is supported by a majority of Washingtonians. Sixty-four percent of Washingtonians said they support wolf recovery in the state, and nearly three out of every four Washington residents – 70 percent – support maintaining sustainable predator populations statewide. That’s because the majority of Washingtonians appreciate that wolves contribute to the overall health of the areas they inhabit, and most residents cite this as the primary reason for their continued support of wolf recovery statewide. Wolves prey on elk, deer and other grazers and, by targeting diseased and injured members of prey populations, wolves help sustain healthy herds. By keeping herd populations in balance and moving across the landscape, wolves also enhance the health and diversity of the plants other wildlife need to thrive. Today there are roughly 53 wolves living in Washington.

Photo by Ian M Dutton

Photo by Ian M Dutton

Update on Pups Rescued from Alaska Fire: Earlier this year, we told you about five wolf pups that were rescued from the Funny River fire on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula. During the fire, firefighters said they heard the cries of wolf pups, and wildlife biologists came to rescue the abandon pups shortly after. After the fire, the pups were taken to the Alaska Zoo to be temporarily cared for. We wanted to share a very sweet picture with you, taken by Ian M Dutton, of two of the wolf pups sitting contently in their zoo caretaker’s lap. According to news that surfaced this week, at the end of the month, the wolves will head to Minnesota where they will find their permanent home in the Apple Valley Zoo.

33 Responses to “Wolf Weekly Wrap Up”

  1. DENISE RUCK

    OHHHHH I CANT HELP MYSELF….. IDAHO IS FOR IDIOTS….. OOPS MY BAD BUT THE TRUTH HURTS

    Reply
  2. Bruce Rickett

    Congratulations to the people of Washington for standing up and doing the right thing.

    Reply
  3. Janis Specht

    Great news for the rescued pups. One of the biggest reasons I donate is to help the wolfs. I hate the movies that depict them in such a vicious manner.

    Reply
  4. salma arabi

    WOLFS AS ALL WILD ANIMALS ARE BORN TO BE FREE. ME MUST LET THEM LIVE THEIR LIVES. LIVE AND LET LIVE. HE ANIMALS HAVE BEEN PUT ON THIS EARTH IT IS FOR A PURPOSE. THEREFORE THIS PLANET BELONGS TO THEM AS WELL. DON’t GO ON THEIR TERRITORY AND THEY WILL NOT COME ON YOURS. WHAT IS THE BEAUTY OF A DEAD NATURE. NATURE AND WILDLIFE MUST SURVIVE, WITHOUT IT OUR PLANET WOULD CEASE TO EXIST AND SO WOULD WE. SO EVEN THOUGH PEOPLE LOOK DOWN ON ANIMALS, YET WITHOUT THEM, PLANET EARTH WOULD BE A DEAD PLANET. SO LET US REACT BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE. AND LET US NOT LET INTELLECTUEL DEFFICIENT PEOPLE, WHO ARE THIRSTY FOR BLOOD DICTATE THEIR CRUEL RULES THAT SATISFIES THEIR COWARDNESS.

    Reply
  5. Natalie Kruse

    I will be establishing an education program in Idaho to counteract these needless attacks on wildlife in the state of Idaho. Thanks Governor Otter for giving me the push I needed to get this done.

    Reply
  6. Joan Young

    I am happy the people in Washington are standing up for the Wolves ,but Idaho, Wyoming and Montana they have some real jerks ruining oh I mean controlling there States!!!

    Reply
  7. Chloe

    Your work is very admirable. Thankyou, for protecting such a beautiful & precious creature. xxxx Keep me updated!

    Reply
  8. Joelle Guiot

    Abandoned pups? Is this known for a fact? They would’ve died, okay. Painfully so, okay. A lifetime in a zoo isn’t such an enviable alternative for large carnivores that have it in their *genes* to roam and hunt.

    Reply
  9. Kassy Peters

    I live in Idaho and just learned of their plan today. I find it horrific and have also learned that they are going to fully take out the wolf population by helicopter. It’s both frustrating and saddening.

    Reply
  10. Maureen Allen

    BRAVO, WASHINGTON! Defenders seems to be everywhere that wildlife needs power and influence, the persuasive catalyst between individuals like us and decision-makers facing natural challenges and human pressures.

    Reply
  11. Frances Bonner

    Funding specifically for fladry may be a good idea.
    If farmers in Idaho were aware of how to be as successful in nonlethal methods as, say California, they may be persuaded to use those methods. How can we get fladry to Idaho farmers? Direct support of farmer nonlethal methods.
    Does not seem like getting some red flags on a rope or twine should be such a huge deal. I can sew some red flags on twine, perhaps a huge combined sewing effort. Who can I talk to about promoting a fladry sew-athon?

    Reply
  12. Tim Cammers

    This is happy day. I happy to hear that they are doing well. That this is the reason why I keep fighting for my wolf brothers and sisters and I will keep fighting now matter what!

    Reply
  13. Alexander Yeung

    This is good news for the wolves. We must get film maker who depicts wolves as evil didn’t look the other story of wolves survival and the importance of earth.

    Reply
  14. john eicher

    Protect the wolves and turtles and soon the benefits that a predator provides will be positive for other animals and plants.

    Reply
  15. Barbara steinberg

    Too much livestock
    You protect when wildlife also needs protecting
    Pups should be protected
    And national chains of fast foods where factory farmers abuse farm animals should not doubly abuse poor wolves

    Reply
  16. Lisa H

    Why a zoo? Why can they not be rehabilitated and released back into the wild? Saved from a fire only to spend the rest of their lives in an enclosure…that stinks!

    Reply
  17. Marilyn Snyder

    Aren’t Idaho and Wasington neighbor states? Amazing how people just a few hundred miles north can be so much more open-minded whereas those in Idaho seem to just go along with their bully governor. Maybe that’s it – he’s got the whole state afraid to speak up for what is right! I think Idaho needs a Governor-Control-Board.

    Reply
  18. Helen Irene Petersen

    Glad the rescued pups are doing well! Glad that progress is being made to save the wolf in other areas

    Reply
  19. JOYCE GRAY

    It appears that political power can be bought in Idaho. Or is the state just filled with bigoted ignorant inhumane people at the top?
    There has to be something that can be done to open the eyes of Idaho’s governor or compel him to evolve into using non-lethal wolf control and co-existence. What does it take to get the anti-wolf army to see we do not have the right to take a species to extinction, especially not twice. We (Americans)
    brought the wolf back to the states because they are a vital part of the ecosystem. Does Idaho’s governor not see that it is cheaper and that there are less livestock losses with non-lethal methods. It has been proven with the lives of 100,000 sheep in the Wood River Wolf Project. Or does he just believe he will get more support to stay governor with the lethal stance. I pray that he will stop killing a species(the wolf), just because he can. And that he will adopt the wiser, more humane stand and at least try the non-lethal methods available for all invloved – the people and the ecosystem (plants and animals- all animals, including the wolves).

    Reply
  20. Mike marceau

    Those pups from Alaska are just too darn cute. Many thumbs up to all involed in their rescue including the zoo that is providing them a safe haven to live out their lives in harassed. Save them all they deserve better from us humans

    Reply
  21. dina

    Apex predators need to be left alone! They are here for a reason, just live every other living creature. Stop messing with Mother Nature! MSN does NOT know it all! Stop playing God!

    Reply
  22. kim b

    I donate to help these magnifcant. Animals survive. They were here before us and deserve protection. Thank you to all who protect them, and return them to where they belong. They take the old & the sick keep everything in snyc. To see a pack in the wild has to be A very special site. It would be to me the most amazing. experience ever!!

    Reply
  23. Ann Hilmanowski

    I’ve been to the Apple Valley Zoo in Minnesota. It will be a wonderful home for the wolf pups. Nice big habitats. Hopefully the pups will be able to remain together all their lives.

    Reply
  24. Kathy Lycos

    Sounds to me that the Idaho gov. was purchased uh placed into office by the blood thirsty men who are going to kill the wolves. Why else would he refuse to even try proven, kinder methods to protect sheep & cows? The lethal control method was bought and paid for at election time. There will be a special circle waiting for these sub-humans.

    Reply
  25. Alexander Yeung

    That idaho government otter is making a big mess and need to be kick out of office. Let someone who knows how to balance the environment without killing the wolves using non lethal methods.

    Reply
  26. Dave Hamilton

    While the Obama administration has been a mixed bag across the board, one must say that it’s treatment of the Interior Department has been a real scandal!…and where the Hell is Sally Jewell, anyway!!…we have to beg her for a review of the obvious travesty progressing in Idaho?!…she should have jumped on FWS months ago!!…but…total silence from the throne is what we get!!!…talk about stinking!!…this, along with so much else at Interior, totally SUCKS!… Dave

    Reply
  27. Dave Hamilton

    Oh!!…I see…A tug on the forelock appears to be required…right??
    Well…the part about the really sorry situation with Interior Department really is central to the whole thing…and I really would like to know where Sally Jewell has been during this whole evolving train wreck at FWS…and I do think it is a tad ridiculous that one must beg for a review of said situation that is so obviously a miscarriage of justice! The populace of this Country has a right to be…and should be…outraged at this Administration’s handling of our public lands!
    This one OK with you guys!? Dave

    Reply
  28. Dave Hamilton

    OK…Please tell me what I am allowed to say on this…anything that is actually to the point…and deserves a response?

    Reply
  29. Dr. Tony Povilitis

    Defenders needs to back up Congressman DeFazio’s call for a buffer zone around our national parks to protect wolves from trophy hunting and trapping. I promise to circulate widely their backup letter to Sec. Jewell. Let’s not blow this opportunity, folks. Get you conservation and animal advocacy organizations to support the Congressman now!

    Reply

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