Courtney Sexton

Courtney Sexton

Communications Associate
Courtney Sexton is a Communications Associate at Defenders of Wildlife. She focuses on issues tied to federal/public lands, wildlife refuges and renewable energy siting, as well as those related to a myriad species throughout California, Oregon and the Southwest, her favorite being the Mexican gray wolf. She can be reached at csexton@defenders.org.

Posts By: Courtney Sexton

Solar facility, © NREL

Two Too Many Development Projects in the Ivanpah Valley »

While these projects most definitely directly impact a species that has been identified as threatened and is dependent on the habitat where they would be built, Silver State South and Stateline’s approval is most troubling for a bigger reason. You see, this isn’t just an issue for the Ivanpah Valley. Developers and agencies need to be conscious of how and where they plan energy projects all across the country. They need to look at renewable energy planning with a landscape-wide lens, understanding that building in the right places and making an effort to minimize environmental impacts from the start are essential.

Cattle, © USDA

On “Mutually Insured Destruction” »

Defenders’ recently-released report “Mutually Insured Destruction: How Unchecked Crop Insurance Subsidies Harm the Environment” lays out the true cost of crop insurance subsidies. Here’s what you should know about how the Farm Bill could impact food, land and wildlife.

Chinook Salmon, © Dave Bickford

Reaching out for wildlife in California »

The Lower Calaveras River, near Sacramento, is one of the most dramatically altered rivers in California, yet provides critical habitat to threatened fish and wildlife, including Fall Run Chinook Salmon and steelhead. Our California team works to teach the local community about the value of this river running through their neighborhood.

Desert Tortoise, © Beth Jackson USFWS

It’s all adding up in Ivanpah »

Within the Mojave, the Ivanpah Valley has been identified as a critical link between conservation areas for one of the region’s most endangered inhabitants, the desert tortoise. At the same time, the Ivanpah Valley is also under mounting pressure from development of many kinds, including such land use impacts as multiple high-acreage renewable energy projects, electricity and gas transmission lines, a wastewater treatment project, airport and a high-speed rail line.