Posts Tagged: USFWS

Pails and 55-gallons drums, contents unknownDeep Fork NWR, OK.

Protecting national wildlife refuges requires more than duct tape »

Totaling more than 150 million acres, the National Wildlife Refuge System is the world’s largest system of protected areas dedicated first and foremost to wildlife conservation. Yet over 200 national wildlife refuges have existing oil and gas infrastructure including 103 refuges and four wetland management districts that have active oil and gas wells. In total there are more than 5,000 wells, with almost 1,700 of those wells actively producing oil and gas.

Grizzly bears, © Todd Mintz

Grizzly Bear Recovery in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem – It’s Complicated »

The Service recently announced it is taking additional time to conduct a thorough assessment of threats facing the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s grizzly bear population before issuing a draft delisting proposal. Initially expected this spring or summer, we likely will not see a delisting proposal for Yellowstone bears until the end of this year, after the Service has had time to conduct this analysis.

Karner Blue Butterfly, © John & Karen Hollingsworth/USFWS

Making Every Penny Count »

Trying to stretch every dollar to do more with less is a familiar dilemma. Unfortunately, it’s an all too familiar one for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and other federal agencies trying to recover over 2,100 species listed under the Endangered Species Act. Given this harsh reality, it’s more important than ever that we prioritize recovery actions to give the most endangered species their best chance for survival.

Mexican gray wolf, © Jim Clark/USFWS

Wolf Wanderers »

And, for the model to work, there must be at least three populations with this movement happening between them. The good news is that this is possible, provided that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service establishes two additional populations and lets lobos move from population to population.